Johnson Matthey and Eminox’s SCRT technology

Johnson Matthey has used its advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to improve the retrofit SCRT system.

Johnson Matthey has used its advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to improve the retrofit SCRT® system. This system has been developed in conjunction with exhaust and emission control systems designer and manufacturer, Eminox.

Johnson Matthey has used its advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to improve the retrofit SCRT system. Johnson Matthey has used its advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to improve the retrofit SCRT® system. This system has been developed in conjunction with exhaust and emission control systems designer and manufacturer, Eminox.

The new system is more compact and was designed to fit smaller space envelopes in existing buses and other commercial vehicles while giving very high emissions reduction performance. Independent testing at Millbrook Proving Ground on a Euro III bus demonstrated oxides of nitrogen (NOx) levels equivalent to that of a new Euro VI bus.  A 97% reduction of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was also recorded.

“This new catalyst technology has given a step change in the performance of our established retrofit SCRT system and takes older Euro III buses up to the emissions levels of the very latest new Euro VI bus” says Dr Richard O’Sullivan, Commercial Director responsible for retrofit activities at Johnson Matthey.

indexThis new retrofit SCRT system is being offered by Eminox to local authorities, other public bodies and private operators in the UK that are currently bidding for awards from the £5m Clean Vehicle Technology Fund announced by Baroness Kramer, Minister of State for Transport, at the beginning of June. The fund is intended to encourage improved emissions of local bus fleets and other vehicles used in areas that suffer from poor air quality. The fund will help towards the cost of adapting vehicles to use exhaust aftertreatment devices, such as the SCRTsystem, or alternatively to convert vehicles to run on cleaner fuels.

In order to improve air quality in our towns and cities and to meet EU air quality standards, NOx emissions in particular, must be reduced.  An effective way of doing this is to reduce emissions from older buses and heavy duty diesel vehicles.

Last year’s Clean Bus Technology Fund helped to pay for the modification of over 500 buses. £7.3 million was awarded last year across 26 local authorities.

The Johnson Matthey/Eminox retrofit SCRT system has been successfully trialled and is being fitted to fleets of buses in the North East and Brighton & Hove.

One single authority can apply for up to £500,000 to upgrade their vehicles but applications must be in by the cut off date of Friday 25 July 2014.

Further details on the Clean Vehicle Technology Fund are available from www.gov.uk/government/collections/clean-vehicle-technology-fund.  

Further information on the products and services of Johnson Matthey Emission Control Technologies can be found at www.jmect.com.

Further information on the product and services of Eminox can be found at www.eminox.com.

Johnson Matthey is a global speciality chemicals company underpinned by science, technology and its people.  A leader in sustainable technologies, many of the group’s products enhance the quality of life of millions through their beneficial impact on the environment, human health and wellbeing.

Johnson Matthey has operations in over 30 countries and employs around 12,000 people. Its products and services are sold across the world to a wide range of advanced technology industries.

Johnson Matthey has used its advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to improve the retrofit SCRT system. Eminox services the European exhaust and emissions control market using an established network of Eminox branches and distributors. The company supplies Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) as well as the aftermarket. Eminox employs over 200 people and has an annual turnover of around £35 million.

Latest Stories